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Obama's lessons for Britain

  • Nov. 5th, 2008 at 10:39 AM
independent_uk

Andrew Grice writes on our blogs of the rush in the UK to be seen withObama:

Barack Obama's remarkable victory is already making waves in British politics. On the face of it, the triumph of change over experience is good news for David Cameron. The Tories have been cosying up to Obama in recent weeks, conveniently forgetting that John McCain addressed their party conference in Bournemouth two years ago.
"America has made history and proved to the world that it is a nation eager for change," Cameron said this morning. "In these difficult times people everywhere are crying out for change." No decoding required there.

Gordon Brown has also been quick out of the traps, reminding us that he has talked to Obama on many occasions and saying he is a "true friend of Britain." Read more.

Does the US election have any implication for politics outside the UK or is this hitching themselves to the wagon a bit embarrassing, much like the British banging on about a Special Relationship that the US clearly doesn't give two hoots about.?

Comments

( Comment )
sheppeyescapee wrote:
Nov. 5th, 2008 11:08 am (UTC)
It kind of smacks of desperation really especially from the labour party who are losing popularity by the day, especially considering the close relationship that Blair and Bush had.

I'm hoping that this election has got the youth of the UK thinking about our next election whenever that will be and get them voting when the time comes.

Edited at 2008-11-05 11:11 am (UTC)
(no subject) - ex_londonso - Nov. 5th, 2008 11:32 am (UTC) Expand
midnightwriter wrote:
Nov. 5th, 2008 11:35 am (UTC)
As long as the two main political party candidates are backed by the corporate elite, the only real change are the faces. With a few exceptions the two mainstream parties are bought and controlled. Remember when Rothschild's wife came out in support of Obama,do you have any idea who her husband is? Take a look at the Rothschild's I emplore you as the most influencial Banksters of all time who funded Rockefeller in his first venture to start Standard Oil. It is the old Paradine where both parties are run by the same corporate elite Banksters.
woopflying wrote:
Nov. 5th, 2008 03:52 pm (UTC)

Of course its a special relationship, we nearly speak the same language
whatsoy wrote:
Nov. 5th, 2008 06:56 pm (UTC)
Actually I was looking to see what was Britain's reaction to Barrack Obama's election to the presidency.
ysabetwordsmith wrote:
Nov. 5th, 2008 07:43 pm (UTC)
Try this...
After observing the post-election behavior of the candidates and the voters, I came up with some things that people can do to help promote unity rather than divisiveness.


Today, liberals are celebrating because Barack Obama won the presidential election and many other seats went to liberal candidates. That means it's our responsibility to take care of the folks for whom the election did not produce satisfying results. Conservatives are feeling as crushed today as we would if John McCain had won. So, let's make an effort to look out for each other. Here are some things you can do to promote unity:

  • Be a graceful winner. Try not to gloat. If you must gloat, do it in private or in like-minded company, where it won't hurt anyone who feels differently.


  • Find something nice to say about the opposing party/candidate/ideals/etc. Remember that other people cherish their opinions as much as you cherish yours, and that praising good behavior increases the chance of repetition. If you can't think of anything, McCain's graceful concession speech is worth considering, in text or video.


  • Reach out to your conservative friends. They need friends right now. They need to remember that you are one of their friends. Do something with them; play a game, go shopping, watch a movie, work on a craft project, whatever works for you. Surprise them with chocolate, music, or another favorite treat.


  • If someone is burned out on politics, let the topic drop for a while. Don't pester them about it. Talk about something totally different that you both enjoy. This is especially helpful at family gatherings when people hold different political stances. It's also good for blogging: post a picture, a recipe, a poem, or some other charming content that has nothing to do with politics.


  • If someone needs to talk about what happened, be a good listener. Listening is a vital skill because it helps people feel better, it can enlighten you, and it improves your connections with other people.


  • Use familiar, homey aromas to foster a communal atmosphere. Scent communicates with the instinctive part of the brain, which is otherwise difficult to reach. For example, cook something that takes hours. A house redolent of food all day helps people feel loved and comforted. Lemon and peppermint are uplifting scents that can ease depression and disperse unpleasantness, which is partly why they're popular in cleaning supplies. (If using fragrances instead of edibles, be subtle; too much can trigger allergies.)


  • Be a graceful loser. Try not to sulk about the issues and seats that the conservatives won. If you must sulk and complain, do it in private or in like-minded company where you won't hurt those who feel otherwise. Bonus points if you can gracefully congratulate people on those wins if they bring up the topic.


  • Remember that we live in the UNITED States of America. It's up to all of us to keep it that way.



  • If you find this post useful, you are welcome to link back to it or to copy it elsewhere with credit to Elizabeth Barrette ysabetwordsmith.
    felephant wrote:
    Nov. 6th, 2008 12:06 am (UTC)
    Re: Try this...
    This strikes me as just the sort of gloating it's advising against. What if your friend discovered that you were using scent to make her feel more at home? If she ever condescended to talk to you again, it'd probably be too soon.
    poelaramont wrote:
    Nov. 6th, 2008 05:25 pm (UTC)
    Re: Try this...
    Yep, because nothing pisses people off more than aromatherapy...
    deusabscondidum wrote:
    Nov. 7th, 2008 06:03 am (UTC)
    Re: Try this...
    I totally agree with this. That's why I decided not to wear my Obama pin the day after.
    lisaee wrote:
    Nov. 5th, 2008 09:35 pm (UTC)
    As someone who might just be of voting age next election, I have no intention of voting Conservative.

    Even if they did run a campaigning proclaiming Obama-esque change, it wouldn't sway me.

    Jumping aboard the Obama bandwagon is a little embarrasing to watch on all sides. Boris Johnson isn't helping.
    (no subject) - zeemort - Nov. 5th, 2008 10:08 pm (UTC)
    halloweenpixie wrote:
    Nov. 6th, 2008 06:32 am (UTC)
    I spent time in Britian...
    ....when my dad was stationed there during the cold war and I remember that the folks there had a lot of respect for the US,but also a burning desire to not be seen as Uncle Sam's lap dog.

    My gut feeling is that Obama's election will have very little effect on British politics and that the UK will chart its own course.
    villey wrote:
    Nov. 6th, 2008 03:10 pm (UTC)
    It sickens me that David Cameron and the Conservatives can claim they have anything in common with Obama's campaign, and if anyone falls for it they are idiots. Conservatives aren't about change and they never will be - you can get yourself a scribbly tree logo and a young man leading the party but that doesn't change what they essentially are - traditionalists who will always favour the rich, encourage 'family' values and take from the poor.

    Come on people, it's all in their party name really. I'm sure they will win the next election cause the same idiots who voted Boris Johnson in as Mayor of London will be voting them in. Damn shame really, but maybe the UK does need to be reminded of why we got rid of them in the first place.
    halloweenpixie wrote:
    Nov. 6th, 2008 03:55 pm (UTC)
    You are right

    Britian does not need conservatives in control anymore than the USA needs them in control.Neither country would possibly want to allow their poor to advance themselves. It is much better to follow the Labour party/Democrats and keep them trapped in a generational cycle of dependency on the goverment. The last time our country had a true conservative in the White House(neither of the Bush boys qaulify) we had 12% of the lower class leaving that economic bracket for the middle and upper class. I support your countries conservatives because I came to love the British people during my stay in your country and I trully believe that conservative ideas will enable those in your country who are poor to work their way in the middle and even upper classes.


    We do agree that it really dumb for the conservative party in your country to try and pretend that they have anything in common with Obama. They need to congratulate him and state that they will work with him to the best of their abilty on issues that affect both countries, but they do not need to ride his coattails and pretend that they are kindred spirits.
    villey wrote:
    Nov. 6th, 2008 04:38 pm (UTC)
    Re: You are right
    Advance themselves? I'm sorry but what country were you visiting exactly? There was little to no social advance under Thatcher, in fact many of the problems we still face as a country, including the depressing state of our working class is thanks to her and her absolute refusal to even acknowledge the working class. In fact, believe it or not - our middle class has grown under Labour, not the Conservatives, and is now the biggest and most powerful class in this country.

    Conservative ideas terrify me if I'm honest. And in a multicultural country with progressive ideas we can not afford to look back at the way things were. I'm sure it would bring about an incredible boom in culture like what came out of the eighties cause of the desperation so many people felt, but really that would be the only benefit. I, for one, don't want to see our hard working immigrants treated like burdens or children eating out of dust bins ever again. It was a disgusting time for this country and while I'm sure David Cameron isn't exactly the same as Thatcher he does share, like all conservatives do, alot of her ideals. Which I would rather chop my hand off than vote for. And that isn't an exageration at all.

    Of course, if you heard a Brit talk fondly of the 1980s I'd like to meet them. Cause I have yet to meet anyone middle class who doesn't shudder at the thought of that decade.
    chamaerops wrote:
    Nov. 6th, 2008 10:43 pm (UTC)
    The Salvador

    Obama

    And you celebrate the arrival of the Salvador
    like finally getting rid of the dictator

    The dictator you so much blame comes from yourself

    As a tree blames his gardener in Autumn
    crying for a never ending Summer

    Why you so much fear the coming Winter?

    The harvest you want to never end
    was sown during the previous Winter

    But you still want to freeze the Time
    while your once fresh harvest is by now bitter and empty

    Then it is time for you to know

    The Salvador is your new gardener
    preparing you for the next harvest

    A wise gardener doesn't try to fight your own Nature

    He will prune your exahusted branches
    because giving only is against your own Nature

    He will feed and care your roots
    because only in your Winter your roots develop strong

    Your falling leaves feed your roots
    and yet you fear you're Becoming less

    Yes who you today call the Salvador
    will bring you the pain that you so much fear

    If you could only see behind your fear :

    He is patiently waiting to show yourself
    your Holy Tree during your New Season

    Your Holy Tree that will descend and happen
    at-onement within your confused tree

    He will mirror yourself as part of the Creation's Dream
    that only through your Will and your Being you can Become

    All this your Dream Sap does already,

    And whilst you are temporary and indispensable
    you translate your Sap into your sap

    Among yourselves somebody is thinking
    "I don't want to be part of this Cycle anymore"

    Therefore you Pray
    that through your seeds your Memory will be passed on

    Pray that your descendants will share themselves
    with the other descendants in harmony

    Even when their empty branches in Winter will still carry some Sap

    Pray that in merging their own vibrations they will Ascend together
    to re-cognize the Dream of the Forest

    The forgotten Dream where you will feed from the Sap

    And when the Sap itself will feed from your sap you will smile
    gratefully in tears at the secrets of your Winters and of your Summers




    celtickath wrote:
    Nov. 7th, 2008 07:53 am (UTC)
    Early voting not counted YET in 2 largest GA Counties
    This is from a vetted blog. My vote didn't count. I was in lin 10/31 with about 700 people of color and maybe 25 honkys like me that seemed eccentric, college educated, progressive. Forget 4.5 hours in the cold. I would stand 8, 9, 10, just count my GDF'in vote. Sounds like there shouldn't have been a Senate runoff in GA. MANY, MANY, Atlanta votes not counted. The 2 largest counties in GA..OMGoddess. I have never been knowingly been disenfranchised before, OMGDoes the Martin Campaign have a statement regarding the so-called missing Georgia early votes?

    Where are the 600,000 or so early votes from Fulton, Dekalb, Gwinette, Cobb etc. in the voting tallies.

    This was the News as of Yesterday morning:

    AP - November 5, 2008 12:14 AM ET - said:

    But vote counting hit a snag late last night as early voting numbers were slow to trickle in. Secretary of State Karen Handel's office said early voting totals from Fulton and Gwinnett counties had yet to be counted. Early voting numbers in those two counties alone totaled more than 275,000 votes.

    In this morning's print edition, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported:

    With nearly 90 percent of the state’s precincts reporting, McCain had a huge lead: 56 percent to 44 percent for Obama and less than 1 percent for Libertarian Party nominee Bob Barr, the former Georgia congressman. But those figures included few results from metro Atlanta and apparently none of the ballots cast in metro Atlanta during massive early and advance voting. As many as 600,000 ballots cast before Tuesday in Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton and Gwinnett were to be counted after the live Tuesday votes.

    (Citation: http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2008/11/5/172717/733/11/654947)

    The SOS website hasn't been updated.

    Where are the votes or alternatively what is the explanation for the discrepancy. How many people voted early in Fulton and Dekalb versus those that voted on election day?


    David Rein on November 6, 2008 12:12 PM


    celtickath wrote:
    Nov. 7th, 2008 08:09 am (UTC)
    OMG, Atlant Early votes not counted!
    This is a vetted blog from Jim Martin GA for Senate. I have never been kknowingly disenfranchised before OMG, OMG! Looks like pop.vote will be dLOW totals & Jim Martin shouldn't even had to have a run off already be
    decided. Can't type or spell, too tired, too frustrated!

    Does the Martin Campaign have a statement regarding the so-called missing Georgia early votes?

    Where are the 600,000 or so early votes from Fulton, Dekalb, Gwinette, Cobb etc. in the voting tallies.

    This was the News as of Yesterday morning:

    AP - November 5, 2008 12:14 AM ET - said:

    But vote counting hit a snag late last night as early voting numbers were slow to trickle in. Secretary of State Karen Handel's office said early voting totals from Fulton and Gwinnett counties had yet to be counted. Early voting numbers in those two counties alone totaled more than 275,000 votes.

    In this morning's print edition, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported:

    With nearly 90 percent of the state’s precincts reporting, McCain had a huge lead: 56 percent to 44 percent for Obama and less than 1 percent for Libertarian Party nominee Bob Barr, the former Georgia congressman. But those figures included few results from metro Atlanta and apparently none of the ballots cast in metro Atlanta during massive early and advance voting. As many as 600,000 ballots cast before Tuesday in Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton and Gwinnett were to be counted after the live Tuesday votes.

    (Citation: http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2008/11/5/172717/733/11/654947)

    The SOS website hasn't been updated.

    Where are the votes or alternatively what is the explanation for the discrepancy. How many people voted early in Fulton and Dekalb versus those that voted on election day?


    David Rein on November 6, 2008 12:12 PM
    brennakimi wrote:
    Nov. 7th, 2008 03:06 pm (UTC)
    (Somehow I missed this entry.)

    If anyone wants to learn something from this election, it ought to be just how important it is to campaign to ALL of a country, and not just the people you think matter or the states you absolutely must win. That, and how vital it is to make the elcetion about the people. Those who have elections often forget that you have created a society goverened by those people. The magic of the Obama campaign is that, while he ran on the policies he was going to put in place, he also ran on how he was going to inspire and empower us to work for our country and our well-being ourselves. The solution to America's problems can't be found solely in any policy, no matter how good it is. The solution to America's problems are to be found in the involvement and action rather than the apathy of her people. I think everyone could stand to have a little more of that.
    ( Comment )