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If the world could vote ...

  • Oct. 7th, 2008 at 10:52 AM
independent_uk

It's perhaps not the most scientific polling device in the world, but the If The World Could Vote website, run out of Iceland, is claiming that over 130,000 users have cast their vote, from 181 countries.

And who do does the world go for? Well, Barack Obama would squeak home if the workld could vote, just pipping John McCain  - with over 87% of the poll to 12.6% for his Republican rival.

Question: Not the most robust data, but there's plenty of evidence that Obama is very popular outside of the US. Does this matter? Does it actually confirm John McCain as a man who looks after US interests rather better?

Comments

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yh_tac wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 10:12 am (UTC)
Maybe it means Obama would do a better job at looking after the USA's international interests, or at least its reputation. So in terms of foreign affairs at least, Obama might be seen as better protecting US interests in the long run.
the_sell_out wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 10:19 am (UTC)
You have to remember that when the US acts it usually affects the rest of the world as well, and when things go downhill in the States the rest of the world follows pretty fast on its heels. If you need evidence there's this thing called 'global financial meltdown' going on that some people might have heard of.

So logically thinking it would make sense to believe that when the rest of the world votes they vote with this in mind.


Also, I would fix those typos if I were you. A lot of people, for example grammar_nazis, are not taking this site seriously because of continuous tiny fuck-ups like those.
sophia_sadek wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 11:26 pm (UTC)
Holy misplaced comma, Batman!
I think I'd rather have grammar nazis stay away from my site. Thanks for mentioning them, though.
Re: Holy misplaced comma, Batman! - arial_archer - Oct. 11th, 2008 06:47 am (UTC) Expand
Re: Holy misplaced comma, Batman! - sophia_sadek - Oct. 11th, 2008 07:32 pm (UTC) Expand
suburbfabulous wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 10:19 am (UTC)
There are those who would argue that Obama's global popularity makes him a rock star while confirming your last question as a fact.
As an American would like to regain a little global dignity, I'd prefer someone who is capable of fostering such positive reaction beyond our borders.
Thanks for the website; I plan on checking it during and after the debates, if only out of curiosity. I don't expect much change, but as someone who's lived in three different houses since Bush took office, I'm OK with that.
ved_vies_kto wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 10:39 am (UTC)
It would be interesting to see similar data from previous elections. I have a hunch that in most places people would've favored the Democratic candidate in the last elections as well... of course 87% to 12% is somewhat extreme, but McCain gets close to no media coverage (at least in Germany and the UK, I don't know about other places), and if he does it is mostly Palin-related. So I wouldn't exactly call those numbers surprizing.
(no subject) - alqarine - Oct. 7th, 2008 10:47 am (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - ved_vies_kto - Oct. 7th, 2008 10:56 am (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - ved_vies_kto - Oct. 7th, 2008 10:49 am (UTC) Expand
seldearslj wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 11:04 am (UTC)
Does it actually confirm John McCain as a man who looks after US interests rather better?

O_o

That's a very digital argument: that because the rest of the world prefers Obama, McCain must be the better choice for America.

It's also slightly terrifying in the underlying assumptions of the belief that the 'best interests of the USA' can only be served by rejecting the candidate that the rest of the world prefers.

The assumption I'm hearing is that the USA should reject the view, beliefs, perspectives, experience, and mindset of The Rest Of The World because it is UnAmerican and therefore Wrong.
tyrell wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 11:18 am (UTC)
Yes. And that the rest of the World is America's enemy, or doesn't want them to succeed. It'd be a funny joke, except I've seen people completely convinced of this online - commie Europe hate McCain, therefore he must be a Patriot (tm). (I am not making this up).

Whereas of course it's more like the view that McCain (and his pro-Bush policies stance) is just a bloody disaster for the US and the World regardless of how 'American' he is.
(no subject) - phantaskippy - Oct. 7th, 2008 02:52 pm (UTC) Expand
lady_lucifera wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 11:28 am (UTC)
I live in Canada, and I have not heard one person who said that they would support John McCain, not even once. Everything that happens in the United States effects us very strongly, and so yes, it does matter. I absolutely do not feel that this means John McCain will look after US interests any better, but that Barrack Obama will be taking cares of issues that happen to have a very widespread effect.
princess__buffy wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 01:22 pm (UTC)
I am Canadian and my whole family supports John McCain (and there are a lot of us). We feel that Obama does not hold America's best interests at heart, he's too busy apologizing for it and trying to make friends with everyone in the world. The media is really unfair with it's coverage of the candidates around the world, almost 100% positive for Obama and anti-Sarah Palin.
(no subject) - lady_lucifera - Oct. 7th, 2008 01:45 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 7th, 2008 01:57 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - arwydd - Oct. 7th, 2008 02:57 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - herekittykitty - Oct. 7th, 2008 04:42 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - arwydd - Oct. 7th, 2008 05:51 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - herekittykitty - Oct. 7th, 2008 06:25 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 7th, 2008 10:52 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - yh_tac - Oct. 8th, 2008 07:41 am (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 8th, 2008 10:29 am (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - takemetothesea - Oct. 7th, 2008 07:40 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 7th, 2008 10:57 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - tinylegacies - Oct. 8th, 2008 11:52 am (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 8th, 2008 02:22 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - lady_lucifera - Oct. 7th, 2008 07:51 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 7th, 2008 10:39 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - lady_lucifera - Oct. 7th, 2008 11:03 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 7th, 2008 11:13 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - lady_lucifera - Oct. 7th, 2008 11:18 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 7th, 2008 11:42 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - princess__buffy - Oct. 8th, 2008 10:45 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - kwsapphire - Oct. 7th, 2008 05:54 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - dobermanndru - Oct. 7th, 2008 10:49 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - kwsapphire - Oct. 9th, 2008 09:36 am (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - princess__buffy - Oct. 8th, 2008 10:55 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - kwsapphire - Oct. 9th, 2008 09:26 am (UTC) Expand
tilfinningunni wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 12:06 pm (UTC)
The united states has cast itself in a bad light these past few years. I think that Obama, not being a complete warmonger, willing to work on issues, is good press.
kylecassidy wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 12:11 pm (UTC)
last i looked it had america going to obama with 82% of the vote, so i suspect there's something askew with its distribution method. but it's a fascinating idea.
jeffxandra wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 12:36 pm (UTC)
If anything, it confirms that a significant population of the United States is xenophobic.
brashley46 wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 01:07 pm (UTC)
Not enough choice there. either the racist warmonger ... or McCain.

Just kidding there; but I'd drop my vote on McKinney in the continued absence of a workers' party.

Edited at 2008-10-07 01:09 pm (UTC)
wolfwyndd wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 03:57 pm (UTC)
You know, it's funny you should mention that. I'm seriously thinking about voting for McKinney. It's not that I really have that much of an interest in seeing her become president, it's more like voting for either of the two major parties is like voting for more of the same. No matter WHO gets into office nothings going to change. We'll pull troops out of Iraq, sooner or later, and the economy will EVENTUALLY get better. The American people will still be ruled by CEO's, major corporations, special interests, and people with enough money to buy what they want.

And if you seriously (not you, specifically, but you, generally) think that voting either way is going to change things you need to wake up and smell the coffee. As long as we have a TWO party system with no major changes to our electoral college, it'll be the same sh$t with a different name attached.
(no subject) - kwsapphire - Oct. 7th, 2008 05:41 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - wolfwyndd - Oct. 8th, 2008 04:19 pm (UTC) Expand
(no subject) - kwsapphire - Oct. 8th, 2008 04:29 pm (UTC) Expand
tyskkvinna wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 01:30 pm (UTC)
Europe - and much of the world in general - leans very liberal, especially in comparison to America's standards. So this is of no surprise to me at all.
dobermanndru wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 01:55 pm (UTC)
It makes no different. The world is not voting - and rightly so. It's an American election for Americans.

I find it a bit amusing when everyone attempts to influence the US election, yet throws their arms up in horror, if US figures even so much as hint who they'd prefer other nations to have as their leaders.
millenium_king wrote:
Oct. 8th, 2008 05:02 pm (UTC)
Totally agree.
mamculuna wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 02:03 pm (UTC)
Eight years of "US first, US only" has not led to any good consequences in any country, including the US. Time indeed for a leader with global sensibilities.
grinninfoole wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 02:34 pm (UTC)
The relative standing of either Obama or McCain probably has more to do with their appeal to folks overseas, and with their interests and values. However, I do think that Obama's popularity is one more point in his favor. Our national prestige desperately needs burnishing, and McCain and his "bomb Iran" sing alongs will not do that.
jeffxandra wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 04:25 pm (UTC)
I'm sorry...
I cannot possibly take anything you say seriously when I hear it in my head with a "Dr. Strangelove" voice...
arwydd wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 02:59 pm (UTC)
People above me have said it, but as far as how this will affect the election... The Rest of the World is not America. They may not be wrong in their assessment, but we still have the final say.
tyskkvinna wrote:
Oct. 7th, 2008 04:46 pm (UTC)
I think a large problem is, though, that a lot of Americans don't want to do something simply because it IS the popular idea elsewhere. I've heard more than a few people say "Well, Europe really liked Obama... that helped change my mind towards McCain." I would like to think that people are bolstering their reasons for their vote on issues, policy, what will actually happen with the government... and not because America has this compelling desire to be the drummer with his own beat and no regard for the rest of the band.
(no subject) - arwydd - Oct. 7th, 2008 05:55 pm (UTC) Expand
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